Struggle with Politics. First stories from our 6 science journalists are in.

Read the first stories online of the 6 science journalists that are reporting on the “Struggle with Politics” in Argentina, Canada, Croatia, Germany/Turkey, Indonesia, and Spain.

This long-term project gives 6 science journalists from 6 nations the possibility to follow 6 politically active scientists. The journalists are on a political journey, reporting on the successes and failures of each scientist-activist as they work to educate lawmakers and promote science in political discourse.

This project takes place within the framework of our World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ2019) in Lausanne  (1-5 July 2019) and hopes to change the actual underreporting on science policy. More information here.

View the Science Talks on understanding HIV/AIDS online

View or review our 3rd Science Talks on Understanding HIV/AIDS for accurate news reporting on Tuesday 25 September 2018. Our hosts for this webinar organized with Wiley Publishers were Dr. Kenneth Mayer and Dr. Annette Sohn from the International AIDS Society.

Media who view/review this webinar will learn more about:

• A brief history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
• What regions are most affected by HIV/AIDS, areas with an uptick in reported cases and the reasons for regional disparities
• How countries respond to the epidemic and the most effective tactics being used in the fight against HIV and AIDS
• Why the current approach to confronting the HIV/AIDS epidemic is drawing criticism; who are those critics and what is their impact on prevention and treatment options
• What treatments are available now and in the future
• Which sources of information are most reliable for journalists reporting on HIV and AIDS


The science that makes a difference in all our lives. Report from the Kavli Prize Week 2018

WFSJ’s vice-president, Milica Momcilovic, represented the Federation at this year’s Kavli Prize Week 2018 in Olso, Norway (1-6 September). It is an immense honor for the WFSJ to be able to participate in this six-day event. We are also grateful to The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, the event organizers, and the Kavli Foundation for their commitment and support to science journalism. Since 2012, 23 fellows – science journalists from all over the world – have had the unique opportunity to attend and report on the excellence in science from Norway.READ MORE

Looking back on the 2018 Kavli Prize Week in Oslo. Our fellows share their impressions.

The successful 2018 Kavli Prize Week in Oslo (1-6 September) was a unique occasion for our five fellows, all science journalists, to attend the multiple events across the city honouring the seven laureates and recognizing them for their seminal advances in the research areas of astrophysics [the origin, structure, and composition of the cosmos], nanoscience [science at the atomic scale], and neuroscience [science of the brain].

What definitely made a big impression on our fellows were the casual and straightforward meetings with the seven laureates. In this post, each of the fellows shares some highlights that had a significant impact on them as a person and on their careers as science journalists. In the following weeks, we will also publish on this blog some of the fellows’ articles based on their Kavli Prize Week experiences and exchanges. READ MORE

Christophe Bourillon named new executive director of the WFSJ


MONTREAL 13 SEPTEMBER – The Board of Directors of the World Federation of Science Journalists (WFSJ) is pleased to announce that Mr. Christophe Bourillon has been appointed as new Executive Director (ED).

Bourillon comes with 25 years of solid experience in senior management and communication at the national and international levels. He founded and led various industry associations, such as the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). He drove other organizations through major transformations, such as the Uranium Institute, the European Biofuels Association, and the European Robotics Association.READ MORE

“I think that science journalism is so incredibly important” [Alan Alda]

The five fellows, science journalists from China, Colombia, Japan/Australia, Mexico, South Africa, are reporting on the 2018 Kavli Prize Week in Oslo, Norway (1-6 September) using their and our social media channels. This has already resulted in some fun exchanges with presenter, activist, and actor Alan Alda, as well as with laureates Jennifer Doudna (nanoscience), James Hudspeth (neuroscience), and Ewine van Dishoeck (astrophysics). On this page, we have collected some of those memorable encounters.READ MORE

Checking in on Fact Checking in Science Journalism

The Knight Science Journalism at MIT program took a close look at one of science journalism’s most underappreciated practices — and uncovered a few surprises.

“The State of Fact Checking in Science Journalism,” one of the first industry-wide looks at how science news publications go about ensuring the trustworthiness of their reporting. A key takeaway: Different outlets approach the task in vastly different ways.

“So, what is the state of fact-checking? The report seems to confirm at least one long-held suspicion: that support for fact-checking is waning. Only about a third of the publications in the study employ independent fact checkers. About 15% said they rely on copy editors for fact-checking. Others place the onus on journalists and editors, and about a third have no formal fact-checking procedures in place at all.”


Read an excerpt and download the full report here.


FUNDING & TEAM

The study was funded by a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, overseen by Knight Science Journalism Program director Deborah Blum, and spearheaded by Brooke Borel, a freelance journalist and editor.


Photo credit: The Climate Reality Project / Unsplash